Monday, 18 August 2014

Pudim Queijo com imprevisto Português

Pudim Queijo de Ilha com alho frances, ervilhas

I got my inspiration for this dish from a plate Chef Marco created at Cha com agua Salgada.The source of my recipe is a very old English dish and one of my all time favourites from my dear mother´s repertoire.It is similar to a soufflé but quicker to prepare, and if made correctly, better behaved. Precise timing is not important.Elizabeth David cites it as being devised in the days when coal burning kitchen ranges were so temperamental,and when hot dishes were subject to long journeys from basement country house kitchens to the lord and lady of the manor´s private parts.My oven is certainly temperamental and like a fallen soufflé this dish has never let me down.The ingredients are simple and so is the preparation.All in all this is a quick and appetising supper dish designed for modern living.The original recipe demands a strong flavoured English Cheese such as Cheddar, Cheshire,Double Gloucester,Leicester,Wensleydale or Lancashire.Dont even think about using processed cheese,it will simply have no flavour.I however replaced the English cheese with Queijo de Ilha from the Açores.In essence similar to cheddar.

Eu tenho a minha inspiração para este prato de uma prato Chef Marco criado em Cha com Agua Salgada.A minha fonte de receita é um prato Inglês muito antiga e um da minha favorita de todos os tempo de reperetoire a minha querida mãe.É semelhante a um suflê, mas mais rápido de preparar e, se feito corretamente mais comportados.O tempo preciso não é importante.Elizabeth David cita-o como sendo elaborados nos dias em fogões de queima de carvão eram tão temperamental, e quando os pratos quentes estavam sujeitos a longas jornadas de porão cozinhas casa de campo para o senhor e senhora da mansão do privado peças.

Meu forno é certamente temperamental e, como um suflê colapsado este prato nunca falhado-me.Os ingredientes são simples e por isso é a preparation.All em todos um prato da ceia puro projetado para living.The moderno receita original exige um forte sabor Queijo Inglês como como Cheddar, Cheshire, Double Gloucester, Leicester, Wensleydale ou Lancashire.Dont sequer pensar em usar queijo processado, ele simplesmente não terá flavour.I substituiu o queijo Inglês com queijo de Ilha da essência Açores.In semelhante ao cheddar.

Pudim de Queijo Ingles tradiçional
Eggs for dinner. Or lunch, or brunch. My cute, puffy little baked omelet soufflés are perfect any time of day.
Although omelet soufflés sound fancy, I love that making them is as simple as cracking some eggs and adding a filling of some sort (for me, the filling is always a vegetable combination.) All you have to do is cook whatever you’ll be using for your filling first, and when done, add the eggs. Actually, you don’t even need to add any filling if you don’t want, but the filling just makes it taste much better and offers a veggie boost too.
Here, for the filling, I use a gourmet mushroom blend, leeks and petite organic peas. Of course there are endless variations on fillings for baked omelet soufflés and you can get quite creative, but it is best to veer on the side of simple and not add more than three ingredients.
I’m never in the mood to shell fresh peas and there is absolutely no advantage to buying fresh peas ready shelled so you might as well just get frozen peas, but do look for organic petite peas because they just taste so much better. Also, it is important when adding any filling to your baked omelet soufflés that you keep the concept of “teeny-tiny” in mind. You don’t want to add big chunks of vegetables or whatever into a delicate and elegant baked omelet soufflé.  You’ll see for the leeks I go so far as to shred them in the food processor, this is not an optional step. It really does make a difference because yes, I have tried to get away with just finely chopping the leeks and it doesn’t work.
Most importantly, for the eggs, be sure to buy the absolute best. That means you want to look for pastured eggs from hens that lived outdoors and had access to fresh pasture.
And finally, don’t fret over whether your baked omelet soufflé rises “just so”, just remember, no matter what happens to an egg dish you can always claim it was intentional.
- See more at: http://www.cleancuisineandmore.com/baked-omelet-souffles/#sthash.Lu5Ln3FD.dpuf

Pudim de Queijo
Serves 3 or can be cut up when cool into picnic portions

You will need a soufflé dish 900ml(1.5 pint) capacity
180g (6oz) Queijo da Ilha,grated (don´t use processed cheese)
2 tablespoons dried breadcrumbs
300ml(1/2 pint cold milk
1/2 cup frozen peas defrosted
1 small leek,finely sliced into rings
2 large or 3 medium sized eggs
1 teaspoon Dijon 
plenty of freshly milled pepper, flor de sal and cayenne

Put the breadcrumbs into the dish.There is no need to butter the dish.Pour the milk over the breadcrumbs.Stir in the grated cheese and the seasonings.Not too much salt but the amount depends on the saltiness of the cheese used so taste as you go.You can put this aside now while you sautée the leeks slowly in butter until soft.Stir in the peas.When cool add to the bread and cheese mixture.
Separate the eggs,beat the yolks thoroughly and stir them into the cheese mixture.Whisk the egg whites to stiff peaks.Stir a spoonful or two into the mixture,then tip in the rest,lifting and folding with a metal spatula or spoon,as lightly and quickly as possible.
Put straight into the middle of an oven pre-heated to 180C /350F /Gas mark 4 and cook for 25-30 minutes.The top of the pudding should be well risen,golden and spongey.Leave it for 5 minutes or so before serving.By that time the inside should be rather like a creamy custard. 
Pantry note
The main ingredients of this dish-breadcrumbs,cheese,milk and seasonings can all be mixed in the dish well ahead of cooking time.Only the eggs need to be added before cooking time.

Eggs for dinner. Or lunch, or brunch. My cute, puffy little baked omelet soufflés are perfect any time of day.
Although omelet soufflés sound fancy, I love that making them is as simple as cracking some eggs and adding a filling of some sort (for me, the filling is always a vegetable combination.) All you have to do is cook whatever you’ll be using for your filling first, and when done, add the eggs. Actually, you don’t even need to add any filling if you don’t want, but the filling just makes it taste much better and offers a veggie boost too.
Here, for the filling, I use a gourmet mushroom blend, leeks and petite organic peas. Of course there are endless variations on fillings for baked omelet soufflés and you can get quite creative, but it is best to veer on the side of simple and not add more than three ingredients.
I’m never in the mood to shell fresh peas and there is absolutely no advantage to buying fresh peas ready shelled so you might as well just get frozen peas, but do look for organic petite peas because they just taste so much better. Also, it is important when adding any filling to your baked omelet soufflés that you keep the concept of “teeny-tiny” in mind. You don’t want to add big chunks of vegetables or whatever into a delicate and elegant baked omelet soufflé.  You’ll see for the leeks I go so far as to shred them in the food processor, this is not an optional step. It really does make a difference because yes, I have tried to get away with just finely chopping the leeks and it doesn’t work.
Most importantly, for the eggs, be sure to buy the absolute best. That means you want to look for pastured eggs from hens that lived outdoors and had access to fresh pasture.
And finally, don’t fret over whether your baked omelet soufflé rises “just so”, just remember, no matter what happens to an egg dish you can always claim it was intentional.
- See more at: http://www.cleancuisineandmore.com/baked-omelet-souffles/#sthash.MwSujgb6.dpuf
Eggs for dinner. Or lunch, or brunch. My cute, puffy little baked omelet soufflés are perfect any time of day.
Although omelet soufflés sound fancy, I love that making them is as simple as cracking some eggs and adding a filling of some sort (for me, the filling is always a vegetable combination.) All you have to do is cook whatever you’ll be using for your filling first, and when done, add the eggs. Actually, you don’t even need to add any filling if you don’t want, but the filling just makes it taste much better and offers a veggie boost too.
Here, for the filling, I use a gourmet mushroom blend, leeks and petite organic peas. Of course there are endless variations on fillings for baked omelet soufflés and you can get quite creative, but it is best to veer on the side of simple and not add more than three ingredients.
I’m never in the mood to shell fresh peas and there is absolutely no advantage to buying fresh peas ready shelled so you might as well just get frozen peas, but do look for organic petite peas because they just taste so much better. Also, it is important when adding any filling to your baked omelet soufflés that you keep the concept of “teeny-tiny” in mind. You don’t want to add big chunks of vegetables or whatever into a delicate and elegant baked omelet soufflé.  You’ll see for the leeks I go so far as to shred them in the food processor, this is not an optional step. It really does make a difference because yes, I have tried to get away with just finely chopping the leeks and it doesn’t work.
Most importantly, for the eggs, be sure to buy the absolute best. That means you want to look for pastured eggs from hens that lived outdoors and had access to fresh pasture.
And finally, don’t fret over whether your baked omelet soufflé rises “just so”, just remember, no matter what happens to an egg dish you can always claim it was intentional.
- See more at: http://www.cleancuisineandmore.com/baked-omelet-souffles/#sthash.MwSujgb6.dpuf

No comments:

Post a Comment